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Bishops Bible 1572 And 1602


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#1 S.k. Williams

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 08:09 PM

I don't know if this is possible for anyone but, I have an interest in how the English Bible has developed. One of the most interesting stories is how the Authorised, or King James, version came about. Many here will know its origins begin with the decision to update the Bishops Bible, and the original Translators were supposed to stay close to the Bishops Bible used as a base text, but lesser known is that the Bishops Bible itself had undergone revision n both 1572 and in 1602, and it is the 1602 edition that was used to form the KJV. At leats nominally.

 

So, for Historical purposes, I was hoping someone had access to a 1572 and/or a 1602 Bishops Bible and could create an ESword Module for both of them. That way people could compare them.

 

I'd do it myself but I don't now how to make ESword Modules and have no access to the Text. None of which seem reprinted. In fact, to have a Hard Copy of the Bishops of 1568 I am having a private Printer produce one. ( I cannot afford the Greatsite version, which is too large anyway for me.)

 

So, does anyone have access o the 1572 or 1602 Bishops Bible? And would they be willing to digitise it and make it available for use?



#2 Tj Higgins

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Posted 09 February 2015 - 08:21 PM

I am not sure about the 1572 or 1602 Bishops Bible but there is 1568 Bishops Bible available for download through the E-sword download function



#3 S.k. Williams

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 01:24 PM

I know. I hav it. I wanted to compare the three.



#4 APsit190

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 01:56 PM



I know. I hav it. I wanted to compare the three.

 

About the only thing you can do is to find an electronic file of that particular edition, i.e., a pdf file, and either create bblx from it using T4 or request someone from here to do it for you. Beyond that, my feeling is that you may be scratching the bottom of the proverbial barrel over it (meaning, you may be asking for something which no longer exists).

 

Blessings,

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Edited by APsit190, 12 February 2015 - 02:29 PM.


#5 APsit190

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 02:47 PM

OK, I've just done a Google search for it, and the Best I could find was from GreatSite.com, which is a hard copy of the 1602 edtion.  Now, if you're really keen on this, then this baby is going to cost you US$16,000 (with an appraisal of US$20,000) as this is an extremely rare book. Probably (just guessing) the only copy left.

 

So, with that done and dusted, To make this into an e-Sword edition, you're gonna have to pull this book apart and risk destroying it, in order to OCR it into a pdf file, and then from there convert the text to an electronic readable format before converting it to an e-Sword Bible (bblx) format.

 

text5.jpg

 

The above image will show you the difficulties that you, in all probability, will encounter. Personally, I wouldn't even touch it.

 

Blessings,

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Edited by APsit190, 12 February 2015 - 03:03 PM.


#6 Tj Higgins

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Posted 12 February 2015 - 08:11 PM



I know. I hav it. I wanted to compare the three.

 

Here is some information from wikipedia 

 

The Bishops' Bible was first published in 1568,[2] but was then re-issued in an extensively revised form in 1572. In the revision a number of switches were made to the New Testament in the direction of more "ecclesiastical" language (e.g. introducing the term "charity" into I Corinthians 13), but otherwise to correct the text more in line with that found in the Geneva Bible; and in the Old Testament, the Psalms from the Great Bible were printed alongside those in the new translation—which had proved impossible to sing. From 1577 the new psalm translation was dropped altogether; while further incremental changes were made to the text of the New Testament in subsequent editions. The Bible had the authority of the royal warrant, and was the second version appointed to be read aloud in church services (cf. Great BibleKing James Bible). It failed to displace the Geneva Bible as a domestic Bible to be read at home, but that was not its intended purpose. The intention was for it to be used in church as what would today be termed a pulpit Bible. The version was more grandiloquent than the Geneva Bible. The first edition was exceptionally large and included 124 full-page illustrations. The second and subsequent editions were rather smaller, around the same size as the first printing of the King James Bible, and mostly lacked illustrations other than frontispieces and maps. The text lacked most of the notes and cross-references in the Geneva Bible, which contained much controversialtheology, but which were helpful to people among whom the Bible was just beginning to circulate in the vernacular. The last edition of the complete Bible was issued in 1602,[2] but the New Testament was reissued until at least 1617.[2] William Fulke published several parallel editions up to 1633,[2] with the New Testament of the Bishops' Bible alongside the Rheims New Testament, specifically to controvert the latter's polemical annotations. The Bishops' Bible or its New Testament went through over 50 editions, whereas the Geneva Bible was reprinted more than 150 times.



#7 Ixa

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 02:44 PM

S.k. Williams have you found anything? I'm interested in that topic too...Please share if you did. Particularly I'm intersted in Boshops' Bible 1572...and it's Psalms. 



#8 S.k. Williams

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Posted 24 February 2015 - 03:20 PM

Regretably no. Hpwever, The Bishops Bible 1572 placed in DOuble COlomn Two sets of Pslams, the original 1568 Translation, and the Psalms in The Great Bible, which were basiclaly just Coverdale's Psalms.



#9 Ixa

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Posted 04 April 2017 - 03:03 PM

Hi S.k Williams,

It's been a long time since your last reply. Thank you for the information you've shared. I'm still interested in the Bishops Bible edition of 1572. Have you managed to compare those three versions?

I am wondering if you could help me....it's about Bishops Bible 1572 and its two-version Psalter (still). One version is the original 1568 translation, as you said,  and the other one is The Great Bible translation. My question is..is it the translation of the Great Bible from 1538, 1539 or 1540? Which one is it? I would be grateful for any reply! 



#10 S.k. Williams

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Posted 14 October 2019 - 10:19 AM

Sorry this post was 2 Years in the making, but 1540. That I know because it was the version then in use in the Book Of Common Prayer when it was quoted, and the Psalms in the Psalter, which had yet to be included in the BOCP.






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