Warning: mysql_num_rows() expects parameter 1 to be resource, boolean given in /home/ipboard/cache/skin_cache/cacheid_1/skin_downloads.php on line 1127 Far Above All - NT Literal Translation Pocket E Sword Version - Bible Support

Jump to content

Submitter



SUPPORT TOPIC File Information

  • Submitted: Mar 31 2012 09:54 AM
  • Last Updated: Mar 31 2012 09:54 AM
  • File Size: 1.59MB
  • Views: 1539
  • Downloads: 86
  • Pocket e-Sword: 3.x

Support BibleSupport.com

  • If our e-Sword and MySword modules have blessed you, please consider a small donation.


    Your donation pays only for dedicated server hosting, bandwidth, software licenses, and capital equipment (scanners, OCR equipment, etc).


    Enter Amount $


    You do not need a paypal account to donate online.


Other Modules By Same Author

  • No modules found

Pocket e-Sword Module Download:
Download Far Above All - NT Literal Translation Pocket E Sword Version

- - - - -

Pocket e-Sword:
3.x

We offer a freely copyable translation of the Bible. The New Testament is based on The New Testament in the Original Greek, Byzantine Textform 2005, by Maurice A. Robinson and William G. Pierpont. We also cover New Testament variants for the Received Text and the Greek Orthodox Church Patriarchal text of 1904, in Greek and English.

A translation of the Old Testament (Tanakh) is under preparation.

www.FarAboveAll.com

About the Source Texts and Translation

The Text

We regard the Bible as one consistent whole, but as the translation of the New Testament has been published whereas that of the Old Testament (Tanakh) is only under preparation at the time of writing, this introduction only covers the New Testament.

We have chosen the Robinson-Pierpont text for the underlying Greek text because we consider it to be in principle the best attested text, not simply because it as a whole is consistently attested by the vast majority of manuscripts, but also because it is also has good early version support (especially the Syriac Peshitta, and often also the Vulgate), and good “church father” support. It is also underpinned by well-founded working principles of transmissional history. See the works of J.W. Burgon and F.H.A. Scrivener, and the appendix to the Robinson-Pierpont text by Maurice A. Robinson, The Case for Byzantine Priority, for a detailed factual and scholarly rebuttal of the modern critical approach which ignores the text in favour of the few and mutually disparate Egyptian manuscripts and their scarce supporters among the ancient witnesses.

We also value the Greek Orthodox Church Patriarchal text of 1904 and the Received Text, which have both served well for a long time, and continue to do so.

The Greek Orthodox Church Patriarchal text was constructed from 20 manuscripts, though with one dominant one, by the Greek Orthodox Church in 1904 and is copyright free. We refer to it as P1904.

The Received Text, or Textus Receptus, is best known in three slightly different editions: the Stephanus edition of 1550, the Elzevir edition of 1624, and the Scrivener edition of 1894. Where all three agree, we denote the reading by TR. Where any one differs from the others, we specify these editions as S1550, E1624 and S1894 respectively. The S1894 edition is what Scrivener took to underlie the Authorized Version.

We have observed that P1904 has more deviations from RP than average in the gospels, and that TR has far more deviations from RP than average in Revelation.

We regard RP as representing, as accurately as the efforts and skill of the compilers would permit, the majority text[1], and P1904 and TR as being fairly typical representatives of that type of text. We would emphasize that since the majority text type manuscripts provide a very solid, consistent witness, there are fewer differences among them than there are in comparison with the very disparate Egyptian texts (è B etc.) and the modern editions which favour them so greatly (such as Westcott-Hort, Nestle-Aland). Moreover, the differences amongst majority text type manuscripts are almost always very trivial, whereas the variant readings in the Egyptian texts, though often trivial, are occasionally of enormous doctrinal importance (e.g. 1 Timothy 3:16, where the majority text reading is God was manifested in the flesh..., a tremendous statement lost in the Nestle-Aland text and modern versions based on it).



[1] We make a distinction between the “majority text” (uncapitalized), which is a general term, and the specific text of The Greek New Testament According to the Majority Text by Hodges and Farstad.

Copyright

There are two areas of copyright to consider: the copyright of sources used and the copyright of our own work. It will be seen that the copyright of the Greek text and of the translation give great freedom.

Copyright of sources used

The Greek text as starting material is the Robinson-Pierpont Byzantine Textform 2005, obtained from http://koti.24.fi/ju...ekNT/RP2005.htm
and also available from
http://byztxt.com/downloads.html

The copyright of the Robinson-Pierpont Byzantine Textform 2005 reads:

Copyright © 2005 by Robinson and Pierpont. Anyone is permitted to copy and distribute this text or any portion of this text. It may be incorporated in a larger work, and/or quoted from, stored in a database retrieval system, photocopied, reprinted, or otherwise duplicated by anyone without prior notification, permission, compensation to the holder, or any other restrictions. All rights to this text are released to everyone and no one can reduce these rights at any time. Copyright is not claimed nor asserted for the new and revised form of the Greek NT text of this edition, nor for the original form of such as initially released into the public domain by the editors, first as printed textual notes in 1979 and in continuous-text electronic form in 1986. Likewise, we hereby release into the public domain the introduction and appendix which have been especially prepared for this edition. The permitted use or reproduction of the Greek text or other material contained within this volume (whether by print, electronic media, or other form) does not imply doctrinal or theological agreement by the present editors and publisher with whatever views may be maintained or promulgated by other publishers. For the purpose of assigning responsibility, it is requested that the present editors' names and the title associated with this text as well as this disclaimer be retained in any subsequent reproduction of this material.
- end of quotation -

In collations with other texts, we refer to the Robinson-Pierpont Byzantine Textform 2005 text as RP.

A full collation (excepting a few trivial differences) is made with:
  • Editions of the Received Text: Stephanus 1550, Elzevir 1624, Scrivener 1894 (so not copyright), obtained from http://koti.24.fi/ju...kNT/NTTexts.htm. We refer to these texts in our notes as S1550, E1624 and S1894 respectively.
  • The Greek Orthodox Church Patriarchal text of 1904, (so not copyright), obtained from http://kainh.homestead.com. We refer to this text in our notes as P1904.
Additional material believed to be copyright free used for supplementary collations includes:
  • A Full and Exact Collation of about Twenty Manuscripts of the Holy Gospels, F.H.A.Scrivener, 1853.
  • An Exact Transcript of the Codex Augiensis, F.H.A.Scrivener, 1859. The book contains collations of fifty manuscripts, between them covering the whole of the New Testament.
  • A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament, F.H.A.Scrivener, 1894.
  • Various works on the text of the New Testament by J.W.Burgon, (19th century, so not copyright).
  • The Clementine Vulgate: Biblia Sacra juxta Vulgatam Clementinam, M. Tweedale (ed.). Available at http://vulsearch.sf.net/html: accessed on 17/11/2009. Copyright status:
The text is released into the public domain, and you can use it as you wish with no legal obligations. Nonetheless, you should consider yourself under a moral obligation to report any errors you find in the text to me. Parts of the text may not be proof-read systematically again, and if you don't point out an error, it may never be corrected. In addition, if you redistribute the text, please mention the source of the text, and make clear any changes you have made to it.
We refer to this text in our notes as VulgC.
  • The Syriac Peshitta: the edition of the British and Foreign Bible Society, in the printing of 1966. The text was prepared before 1920, and there is no standard copyright notice in the book, so we presume the text is copyright free. We refer to this text in our notes as SyrP.
Our copyright

This introduction, the English translation of the New Testament and associated notes (all collectively referred to as "this text" below) are Copyright © 2009-2011 by Graham G Thomason.

Anyone is permitted to copy and distribute this text or any portion of this text. It may be incorporated in a larger work, and/or quoted from, stored in a database retrieval system, photocopied, reprinted, or otherwise duplicated by anyone without prior notification, permission, compensation to the holder, or any other restrictions. All rights to this text are released to everyone and no one can reduce these rights at any time. The permitted use or reproduction of the above-mentioned text does not imply doctrinal or theological agreement by the present author and publisher with whatever views may be maintained or promulgated by other publishers. For the purpose of assigning responsibility, it is requested that the present author's name and the title associated with this text and its availability at www.FarAboveAll.com as well as this disclaimer be retained in any subsequent reproduction of this material.
- end of quotation -






30 user(s) are online (in the past 30 minutes)

3 members, 26 guests, 0 anonymous users


analogelliott, thbjr, Alexa (1), Alan Temo