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  • Submitted: Mar 20 2013 11:20 AM
  • Last Updated: Mar 20 2013 11:30 AM
  • File Size: 7.67MB
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  • Author: Patrick Fairbairn
  • e-Sword Version: 9.x - 10.x
  • Tab Name: Fairbairn

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Download Fairbairn, Patrick - Commentary on Ezekiel, Jonah, and Pastoral Epistles

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Titus Timothy Ezekiel Jonah Greek Hebrew
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Author:
Patrick Fairbairn

e-Sword Version:
9.x - 10.x

Tab Name:
Fairbairn

Pastoral Epistles (Timothy and Titus)
THE PASTORAL EPISTLES, The Greek Text with Translation WITH INTRODUCTION, EXPOSITORY NOTES, AND DISSERTATIONS.

Spurgeon comments on this as follows:

''What with a good translation, full defense of the Apostolic authorship of the Epistles, fruitful comments, and profitable dissertations, this volume is about as complete a guide to the smaller epistles as one could desire (Commenting and Commentaries, p. 184)


Though there is frequent mention of the Greek, and occasionally of other languages, they do not interfere with the reader’s understanding.

Ezekiel
EZEKIEL AND THE BOOK OF HIS PROPHECY: An Exposition.

Spurgeon comments:

''This exposition has passed through three editions, and has gained for its author a high place among elucidators of difficult parts of Scripture. Dr. Fairbairn has a cool judgment and a warm heart; he has cast much light upon Ezekiel’s wheels, and has evidently felt the touch of the live coal, which is better still'' (Commenting and Commentaries).


Cyril J. Barber comments:

''Makes judicious use of the Hebrew text, but not at the expense of the English reader. Provides a timely exposition that is devotional as well as historical and practical.'' (The Minister’s Library)


The last eight chapters of Ezekiel have always been difficult for both public and expositors. Fairbairn gives four views held by various men, the fourth of which he favors: Considering his [Ezekiel’s] peculiar manner, it was no more than might have been expected, that, when going to present a grand outline of the good in store for God’s Church and people, the picture should be drawn with the fullest detail. If he has done so on similar but less important occasions [as with Tyre], he could not fail to do it here, when rising to the very top and climax of all his revelations. For it is pre-eminently by means of the minuteness and completeness of his descriptions that he seeks to impress our minds with a feeling of the Divine certainty of the truth disclosed in them, and to give, as it were, weight and body to our apprehensions.''

Fairbairn, thus, believes that there is as much symbolism in this last vision of Ezekiel as in the symbolism of the former Temple and also Moses’ Tabernacle. In all there is a preview of the glorious future with the Messiah, who is prophet, priest, and king, as pre-figured before.

In Chapter 18, where some find it a contradiction to the doctrine of salvation by faith in Christ to receive life, Fairbairn makes it plain that when it shows a bad man’s reformation, and ''he shall live,'' it is only physical life. There still is no salvation by keeping the Law.

Jonah
JONAH HIS LIFE, CHARACTER, AND MISSION, VIEWED IN CONNEXION WITH THE PROPHET’S OWN TIMES, AND FUTURE MANIFESTATIONS OF GOD’S MIND AND WILL IN PROPHECY
Spurgeon called this "by far the ablest English treatment on this subject", although he seems to have given Hugh Martin’s much longer work equal commendation.

e-Sword Edition
This text was provided by Bill Anderson @ StillTruth.com

Book comments routinely contain introductory and end-of-book material, such as concluding statements and appendices.

About Patrick Fairbairn
Patrick Fairbairn (1805-1874) was born in Berwickshire, Scotland, studied at Edinburgh University, and was an outstanding scholar among Scottish Presbyterians. After 27 years in pastoral service, he served three years as divinity professor at the Free Church College in Aberdeen before becoming principal of the Free Church College, Glasgow, for 18 years until his death.

Fairbairn was one of the most productive ministers during his age. He produced books on many subjects, and edited a 6-volume Bible Dictionary.



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