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Will e-Sword run on a Windows Phone ?


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#1 Strings And Verses

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 11:09 AM

I am seriously considering buying a Windows Smart Phone, but only if I can run eSword on it.

Has anyone gotten e-Sword to run on your own Windows Phone ?  If so, what make and model of phone are you running e-Sword on ?

Sincerely,  In Christ,

SaV

#2 pfpeller

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 11:18 AM

Pocket e sword will not run on any Windows 7 smartphones, only WM 6.5 and below.



#3 jonathon

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 02:28 PM

I am seriously considering buying a Windows Smart Phone, but only if I can run eSword on it.


Pocket e-Sword runs on Windows Mobile 6.5, and lower.
e-Sword runs on Windows 7, Windows Vista, and earlier incarnations of Windows NT.

The odds of e-Sword running on a mobile device that uses Windows 8 are minimal.
Nokia is the only hardware manufacturer that has publicly stated that they are designing and developing hardware for Windows 8 on mobile devices. At the rate that Elop is running it into the ground, it will have fallen into receivership, prior to the release of Windows 8.

When Microsoft sponsored the coup d'├ętat of Nokia, all of the other mobile device hardware vendors dropped out of the Windows Mobile hardware space. The only products that are available, are those that are being developed, or manufactured for existing contracts. Nokia is the mobile device manufacturer whose CEO hasn't said (paraphrased) pay us, and we might consider developing something for Windows 8 in the smartphone/mobile device space.

It is a toss up between Windows Mobile 7, and Windows Vista, as to which is the bigger disaster for Microsoft. Both of them rank with Windows ME, as being abject failures by Microsoft. Microsoft Kin demonstrated why Windows Mobile 7 would be a marketplace disaster.

You've got wonder about the long term stability of a company, when sales people point blank refuse to give a product away gratis, even though doing so gives them a commission check, with special bonuses for every "x" number that they do give away. (The product in question is Microsoft Windows Mobile phones. The sales people are the employees of the carriers, and their authorized agents that do, allegedly, offer WinMo 7 phones.)

jonathon

#4 Fireandsalt

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 03:25 PM

Won't work. The required dlls and hmi apis are not available on windows mobile to allow e-sword to run on a mobile phone or pda device.

#5 APsit190

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 06:49 PM

Pocket e-Sword runs on Windows Mobile 6.5, and lower.
e-Sword runs on Windows 7, Windows Vista, and earlier incarnations of Windows NT.

The odds of e-Sword running on a mobile device that uses Windows 8 are minimal.
Nokia is the only hardware manufacturer that has publicly stated that they are designing and developing hardware for Windows 8 on mobile devices. At the rate that Elop is running it into the ground, it will have fallen into receivership, prior to the release of Windows 8.

When Microsoft sponsored the coup d'├ętat of Nokia, all of the other mobile device hardware vendors dropped out of the Windows Mobile hardware space. The only products that are available, are those that are being developed, or manufactured for existing contracts. Nokia is the mobile device manufacturer whose CEO hasn't said (paraphrased) pay us, and we might consider developing something for Windows 8 in the smartphone/mobile device space.

It is a toss up between Windows Mobile 7, and Windows Vista, as to which is the bigger disaster for Microsoft. Both of them rank with Windows ME, as being abject failures by Microsoft. Microsoft Kin demonstrated why Windows Mobile 7 would be a marketplace disaster.

You've got wonder about the long term stability of a company, when sales people point blank refuse to give a product away gratis, even though doing so gives them a commission check, with special bonuses for every "x" number that they do give away. (The product in question is Microsoft Windows Mobile phones. The sales people are the employees of the carriers, and their authorized agents that do, allegedly, offer WinMo 7 phones.)

jonathon


Hi Jonathon.
Also the bets are out on Windows 8 Metro for Desktop is also going to be a major flop. From my reading the vast majority of PC users (including the Business sector) don't like and don't want the Metro design.

Blessings,
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#6 pfpeller

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 09:48 PM

You've got wonder about the long term stability of a company, when sales people point blank refuse to give a product away gratis, even though doing so gives them a commission check, with special bonuses for every "x" number that they do give away. (The product in question is Microsoft Windows Mobile phones. The sales people are the employees of the carriers, and their authorized agents that do, allegedly, offer WinMo 7 phones.)


I would guess that Microsoft will be ok long term as lang as a majority of businesses keep using the products. I do not hear of big business even considering migrating away from Microsoft products.

We even use Microsoft operating systems as the HMI for industrial process control in highly hazardous processes. There is no discussion in the road map for companies like Honeywell of moving away from Microsoft products (at least that I have heard).

Peter

#7 jonathon

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 06:38 PM

I would guess that Microsoft will be ok long term as long as a majority of businesses keep using the products.


About a decade ago, Microsoft's strategy shifted to retreating upstream, whilst locking up everything. About five years ago, it aded filing frivelous lawsuits about infringments of non-patents to its arsenal. (This is in addition to creating, funding, and supporting patent trolls since the mid-nineties. It now acts as a patent troll in its own right, rather than exclusively through fronts such as Intellectual Vultures, Inc.)

I do not hear of big business even considering migrating away from Microsoft products.


A standard tactic is to tell Microsoft that they will switch to Linux as the OS, OpenOffice.org (maybe that should now be Apache OpenOffice, or LibreOffice), Firefox, and Thunderbird.

Until a decade ago, Microsoft could ignore such tactics, becuase the odds were that the negotiating organization would not switch. Today, that switch is more than a theoretical possibility. Depending upon the specific software requirements of the organization, and existing legacy software, the time frame required for migrating can range from thirty days, to five years.

The virtue of bring FLOSS into the equation, is that Microsoft will license their product, at figures that are substantially below "list". Think US$1.00 per year, per seat, for Microsoft Windows 7 Enterprise Edition, Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus Edition, and related backoffice software.

Currently, Microsoft dominates the front office. It is fighting for its life in both server space, and back office space. If MS Windows license and MS Office license revenue can't subsidize the rest of the company, it goes down.

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is driving Microsoft out of both the front office, and back office, for mission critical functions:
  • When I was hospitalized late last year, the ambulance driver wrote down my medical data on his iPad. The LEO wrote down the data he needed on his tablet. In ER, yet another person wrote down the data they needed, on their tablet. I think the intake office was the only place that was using desktops. Everybody else was using tablets that ran either iOS or Android;
  • Food establishments are migrating to iOS or Android tablets in both food prep and dining areas. (The wait person writes the order into the tablet. Food prep reads the order, and sends a note saying that food is ready for pickup. When the dining guests are ready for the bill, the waitperson simply prints it out, and gives it to the guest. The payment transaction can be run at the table. If the guest needs a receipt, it can be either printed out, or emailed);
  • Call centers are migrating those who work the phones to tablets, from desktops/laptops;
  • Sales people are migrating to tablets, because they are lighter, and can contain/do everything that they used to do on a laptop. This is, in part, based upon cloud migration, and SAAS, which is, at least partially, a result of BYOD;
Five years ago, these and similar functions required a laptop, if not a desktop system.

As both data, and services migrate to "the cloud", the platform becomes increasingly irrelevant. At some point, it becomes cheaper/more cost effective/more secure to replace desktops and laptops with tablets.

Currently, NSA Android is more secure, out of the box, than anything that either Microsoft or Apple offers, for tablets, netbooks, notebooks, laptops, or desktops.

There is no discussion in the road map for companies like Honeywell of moving away from Microsoft products (at least that I have heard).


I doubt it uses Microsoft products in its aerospace products. It might, but as the US Navy has demonstrated several times, Microsoft products aren't reliable enough for standard maritime manouvers, much less the combat arena, which is where Honeywell devotes its R&D.

Going back to desktops/laptops, the critical issue is software, and what type of support is available. The economics of software for tablets is such that one either has in-house programmers (same cost as a support contract), or purchases a competing product (much cheaper than a support contract). When corporate data is in the cloud, and SAAS is utilized, BYOD is both feasible, and cheaper. That trend --- BYOD --- is financially killing Microsoft.

jonathon

#8 APsit190

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 09:18 PM

About a decade ago, Microsoft's strategy shifted to retreating upstream, whilst locking up everything. About five years ago, it aded filing frivelous lawsuits about infringments of non-patents to its arsenal. (This is in addition to creating, funding, and supporting patent trolls since the mid-nineties. It now acts as a patent troll in its own right, rather than exclusively through fronts such as Intellectual Vultures, Inc.)



A standard tactic is to tell Microsoft that they will switch to Linux as the OS, OpenOffice.org (maybe that should now be Apache OpenOffice, or LibreOffice), Firefox, and Thunderbird.

Until a decade ago, Microsoft could ignore such tactics, becuase the odds were that the negotiating organization would not switch. Today, that switch is more than a theoretical possibility. Depending upon the specific software requirements of the organization, and existing legacy software, the time frame required for migrating can range from thirty days, to five years.

The virtue of bring FLOSS into the equation, is that Microsoft will license their product, at figures that are substantially below "list". Think US$1.00 per year, per seat, for Microsoft Windows 7 Enterprise Edition, Microsoft Office 2010 Professional Plus Edition, and related backoffice software.

Currently, Microsoft dominates the front office. It is fighting for its life in both server space, and back office space. If MS Windows license and MS Office license revenue can't subsidize the rest of the company, it goes down.

BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) is driving Microsoft out of both the front office, and back office, for mission critical functions:

  • When I was hospitalized late last year, the ambulance driver wrote down my medical data on his iPad. The LEO wrote down the data he needed on his tablet. In ER, yet another person wrote down the data they needed, on their tablet. I think the intake office was the only place that was using desktops. Everybody else was using tablets that ran either iOS or Android;
  • Food establishments are migrating to iOS or Android tablets in both food prep and dining areas. (The wait person writes the order into the tablet. Food prep reads the order, and sends a note saying that food is ready for pickup. When the dining guests are ready for the bill, the waitperson simply prints it out, and gives it to the guest. The payment transaction can be run at the table. If the guest needs a receipt, it can be either printed out, or emailed);
  • Call centers are migrating those who work the phones to tablets, from desktops/laptops;
  • Sales people are migrating to tablets, because they are lighter, and can contain/do everything that they used to do on a laptop. This is, in part, based upon cloud migration, and SAAS, which is, at least partially, a result of BYOD;
Five years ago, these and similar functions required a laptop, if not a desktop system.

As both data, and services migrate to "the cloud", the platform becomes increasingly irrelevant. At some point, it becomes cheaper/more cost effective/more secure to replace desktops and laptops with tablets.

Currently, NSA Android is more secure, out of the box, than anything that either Microsoft or Apple offers, for tablets, netbooks, notebooks, laptops, or desktops.



I doubt it uses Microsoft products in its aerospace products. It might, but as the US Navy has demonstrated several times, Microsoft products aren't reliable enough for standard maritime manouvers, much less the combat arena, which is where Honeywell devotes its R&D.

Going back to desktops/laptops, the critical issue is software, and what type of support is available. The economics of software for tablets is such that one either has in-house programmers (same cost as a support contract), or purchases a competing product (much cheaper than a support contract). When corporate data is in the cloud, and SAAS is utilized, BYOD is both feasible, and cheaper. That trend --- BYOD --- is financially killing Microsoft.

jonathon



Hi Pete,
Moreover, Microsoft is that far behind the 8 ball of the Mobile market that its almost non-existent. It only make an appearance by virtue of Nokia, and that is about it, despite some reports about Win 7 (and possibly 8) being far more advanced and secure than other OS's for mobile devices.

From my reading, the direction that Microsoft has taken with the Metro style on all its styles of Operating Systems:
  • Windows for PC/Laptops
  • Windows for Mobile
  • Windows for Xbox
there is a huge resistance of it, especially in the Business sector.

IMHO I think with the strong possibility of Windows 8 failing and what Jonathon has shared, I believe will place Microsoft under huge financial pressure, that they will actually allow other competitors to take over the Desktop/Notepad Operation System market. The comeback of UNIX through Apple is a good example of this.

Blessings,
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#9 coollc

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Posted 28 January 2013 - 06:06 PM

Allow me to go back to the original question posted by Strings and Verses.

There is a solution for Windows Phones. It even works in Windows 8 Pro and RT. It is called Cross Connect. It can be found on the Store (the Windows equivalent to the app store or market place). This program uses all the modules that work on The Sword Project. I have converted all of my e-Sword modules to it. The same modules work on the iPhone Pocket Sword program. Try either one They are both good.

Android's MySword is the best smartphone Bible app of all and the best for Android. But it uses a different module method.

Windows Phone Cross Connect is the second best of all and the best for Windows Phone 7 and 8.

iPhone Pocket Sword is the third best of all but the best for iPhones.



#10 Alexandru Anastasiu

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 05:27 PM

Allow me to go back to the original question posted by Strings and Verses.

There is a solution for Windows Phones. It even works in Windows 8 Pro and RT. It is called Cross Connect. It can be found on the Store (the Windows equivalent to the app store or market place). This program uses all the modules that work on The Sword Project. I have converted all of my e-Sword modules to it. The same modules work on the iPhone Pocket Sword program. Try either one They are both good.

Android's MySword is the best smartphone Bible app of all and the best for Android. But it uses a different module method.

Windows Phone Cross Connect is the second best of all and the best for Windows Phone 7 and 8.

iPhone Pocket Sword is the third best of all but the best for iPhones.

How can you convert the e-sword modules to Cross Connect?





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