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  • Submitted: Feb 22 2017 05:52 AM
  • Last Updated: Feb 23 2017 02:55 AM
  • File Size: 22.4MB
  • Views: 2752
  • Downloads: 885
  • Author: Alan Bunning; derivative work by Eliran Wong
  • e-Sword Version: 9.x - 10.x
  • Tab Name: Greek, new testament, scripture, byz, tr, st, wh, sbl, na28, nestle, kjtr, textus, receptus, textual, criticism, variant, reading
  • Suggest New Tag:: Greek, new testament, scripture, byz, tr, st, wh, sbl, na28, nestle, kjtr, textus, receptus, textual, criticism, variant, reading

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e-Sword 9+ Module Download:
Download SBL Greek New Testament (textual variants; visual comparison) 1.1

- - - - -
Screenshots
Author:
Alan Bunning; derivative work by Eliran Wong

e-Sword Version:
9.x - 10.x

Tab Name:
Greek, new testament, scripture, byz, tr, st, wh, sbl, na28, nestle, kjtr, textus, receptus, textual, criticism, variant, reading

Suggest New Tag::
Greek, new testament, scripture, byz, tr, st, wh, sbl, na28, nestle, kjtr, textus, receptus, textual, criticism, variant, reading

version 1.1
- SBLGNT.cmti further formatted
- GNT.cmti added; ancient Greek font; please install KoineGreek.ttf for proper viewing
- KoineGreek.ttf.zip; please unzip before installation
- please refer to 2 screenshots in download area for different between SBLGNT.cmti and GNT.cmti

- remarks: further versions may add earliest manuscripts to GNT.cmti

SBLGNT (textual variants; visual comparison)
- e-Sword commentary module created by Eliran Wong (updated on 22FEB2017)
- e-Sword is a bible freeware developed by Rick Meyers (e-sword.net)
- visual comparison of textual variants in SBLGNT with BYZ, KJTR, NA28, ST, WH
- source of manuscripts: http://greekcntr.org/
- work on comparison and highlighting: https://github.com/e.../SBLGNT-add-ons
- license: All downloads are copyright © 2016 by Alan Bunning released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).

Usage
- text of SBLGNT is placed in the first row in each table, followed by other critical editions, BYZ, KJTR, NA28, ST, WH, where variants are applicable.
- Greek words higlighted in blue are Greek words in SBLGNT, which either absent or different in other manuscipts.
- textual markers, which are placed under blue Greek words (BYZ, KJTR, NA28, ST, WH), indicates which text(s) has variant readings of the blue word(s) above the markers.
- Greek words higlighted in red are variant readings in text(s) other than SBLGNT
- In cases blue words are indicated in SBL and the text indicated by the markers are not listed below, those Greek words are simply absent from those eidtions.

Description on critical editions (by Alan Bunning)

CTSBL
Copyright © 2016 by Alan Bunning under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
- Matt.-Rev. omitting Matt. 17:21, 18:11, 23:14, Mark 7:16, 9:44, 46, 11:26, 15:28, 16:9-20, Luke 17:36, 23:17, John 5:4, 7:53-8:11, Acts 8:37, 15:34, 24:7, 28:29, Rom. 16:25-27
- Holmes, Michael W., The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition, Society of Biblical Literature: Atlanta, GA, 2010. OCLC 688340471.
- Note: The 2010 Society of Biblical Literature (SBL) text was prepared by Michael Holmes in order to produce a modern eclectic text made freely available to the public. The SBL text was initially based off of the 1885 Westcott and Hort text which was brought up to modern orthographic standards. This text was then compared with the 2005 Byzantine Textform text, the 1857 Tregelles text, and the Greek text that was used by the New International Version (NIV). The editor generally accepted the reading wherever all four of these texts were in agreement and then selected between variants whenever the texts differed. [Copyright © 2010 Society of Biblical Literature and Logos Bible Software.]

CTBYZ
Copyright © 2016 by Alan Bunning under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
- Matt.-Rev. omitting Luke 17:36, Acts 8:37, 15:34, 24:7
- Robinson, Maurice A. and William G. Pierpont, The New Testament in the Original Greek: Byzantine Textform 2005, Chilton Book Publishing: Southborough, MA, 2005 December 1. OCLC 61652820.
- Note: The 2005 Byzantine Textform (BYZ) text originated from the work of William Grover Pierpont who after studying many textual variants began to favor certain Byzantine readings as superior. Pierpont, who was later joined by Maurice A. Robinson, worked from a microfilm of the 1913 Hermann Freiherr von Soden text and categorized each variant on the basis of internal and external evidence. The BYZ text does not attempt to represent the simple majority of all manuscripts, but rather the earliest form of the Byzantine text. The underlying theory of textual transmission known as the “Byzantine-priority†hypothesis is that a single text-type or “textform†would be more likely to reflect the original autographs than an eclectic or documentary method. Although the BYZ text favors several later manuscripts similar to the Textus Receptus, it is not a true Textus Receptus text and differs from it in about a thousand places. [Copyright © 2005 by Robinson and Pierpont. Released into the public domain.]

CTKJTR
Copyright © 2016 by Alan Bunning under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
- Matt.-Rev.
- Bunning, Alan, King James Textus Receptus, Alan Bunning: Lafayette, IN, 2014.
- Note: The 2016 King James Textus Receptus (KJTR) text was prepared by Alan Bunning to reconstruct the Greek text matching the English of the various so-called “1769 editions†of the King James Bible commonly used today. Such King James Bibles do not actually follow either the 1769 Cambridge or 1769 Oxford editions as they have undergone further editing. The KJTR text is similar to the 1884 Scrivener text (which also sought to reconstruct the Greek text underlying the King James Bible), but deviates from it in hundreds of places in order to accommodate these “1769 editionsâ€. By happenstance, the KJTR text also matches the text of the 2006 Pure Cambridge Edition, which merely borrowed readings from these various “1769 editionsâ€. [Copyright © 2016 by Alan Bunning released under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0).]

CTNA28
Copyright © 2016 by Alan Bunning under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
- Matt.-Rev. omitting Matt. 17:21, 18:11, 23:14, Mark 7:16, 9:44, 46, 11:26, 15:28, 16:9-20, Luke 17:36, 22:43-44, 23:17, John 5:4, 7:53-8:11, Acts 8:37, 15:34, 24:7, 28:29, Rom. 16:24
- Institute for New Testament Textual Research, Novum Testamentum Graece: Nestle-Aland, 28th edition, German Bible Society: Berlin, Germany, 1993. OCLC 812168953.
- Note: The Nestle-Aland 28th edition (NA28) text is an eclectic text which evolved through a series of revisions which began with Eberhard Nestle’s 1st edition in 1898 and was later produced by the Institute for New Testament Textual Research in Münster, Germany. Kurt Aland became the associate editor of the text beginning with the 21st edition in 1952. The NA28 text is similar to the 1885 Westcott & Hort text as it often aligns itself with the earliest Alexandrian texts such as codices Vaticanus and Sinaiticus in opposition to the Byzantine majority. The NA28 text is identical to the United Bible Society’s 5th edition (USB5) and this lineage of texts has provided the basis for many modern Bible versions such as the NASB and the NIV and is often used by missionary societies when translating the New Testament into foreign languages. [Copyright: The compilation of a preexisting public domain work is a public domain work in the United States (see 17 U.S. Code §103b and Feist Publications, Inc. V. Rural Telephone Service Co., 499 U.S. 340, 1991). Reproduction of this content may be restricted in other jurisdictions.]

CTST
Copyright © 2016 by Alan Bunning under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
- Matt.-Rev.
- Estienne, Robert, Nouum Iesu Christi D.N. Testamentum, Ex officina R. Stephani: Geneva, Switzerland, 1550. OCLC 557722140.
- Note: The 1550 Stephanus (ST) text was produced by Roberti Stephani (also known as Robert Estienne) of Paris. This text is also known as the “Royal edition†in England and is sometimes referred to as the “Berry†text in reference to George Ricker Berry's interlinear. This is one of several Textus Receptus texts and closely follows Erasmus’ 1527 and 1535 editions. The ST text was the first edition to include marginal variant readings, consulting 14 Greek manuscripts as well as the Complutensian Polyglot. Stephanus also published editions in 1546, 1549, and 1551, but his 1550 edition became one of the most popular Textus Receptus texts and was one of the texts used by the 1611 King James Bible translators. [Copyright: Public Domain.]

CTWH
Copyright © 2016 by Alan Bunning under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License (CC BY-NC-ND 4.0)
- Matt.-Rev. omitting Matt. 12:47, 16:3, 17:21, 18:11, 23:14, Mark 7:16, 9:44, 46, 11:26, 15:28, 16:9-20, Luke 17:36, 22:20, 43-44, 23:17, 24:12, 40, John 5:4, 7:53-8:11, Acts 8:37, 15:34, 24:7, 28:29, Rom. 16:24
- Westcott, Brooke Foss and Fenton John Anthony Hort, The New Testament in the Original Greek, MacMillan and Co.: Cambridge, England, 1885. OCLC 6126378.
- Note: The 1885 Wescott and Hort (WH) text was the last version produced by Brooke Foss Westcott and Fenton John Anthony Hart who were both Anglican bishops in the Church of England. Westcott and Hort are often credited for their bold approach of deviating from the Textus Receptus and embracing the Alexandrian texts on the basis of their earlier dates. Westcott and Hort heavily relied on the joint testimony of the two oldest manuscripts known at that time, Codex Sinaiticus and Codex Vaticanus, and believed that the combined testimony of these two manuscripts would essentially guarantee the correct original reading. As a result, their text reflects the Alexandrian text-type which was the “majority†text in use up through the 8th century. However, most scholars who favor an Alexandrian text today, now reject many of their underlying principles and view their excessive reliance on these two manuscripts as being extreme. [Copyright: Public Domain.]

What's New in Version 1.1 (See full changelog)

  • version 1.1
  • - SBLGNT.cmti further formatted
  • - GNT.cmti added; ancient Greek font; please install KoineGreek.ttf for proper viewing
  • - KoineGreek.ttf.zip; please unzip before installation
  • - please refer to 2 screenshots in download area for different between SBLGNT.cmti and GNT.cmti


added another commentary GNTvar.cmti to work with ancient Greek font ... a screenshot here ... have to install KoineGreek.ttf ...

 

updated to version 1.1 
- SBLGNT.cmti further formatted
- GNT.cmti added; ancient Greek font; please install KoineGreek.ttf for proper viewing
- KoineGreek.ttf.zip; please unzip before installation
- please refer to 2 screenshots in download area for different between SBLGNT.cmti and GNT.cmti
- remarks: further versions may add earliest manuscripts to GNT.cmti

in case you like this module and want handy links of the textual variants for any verses.

 

I had links all NT verses to the original work of CNTR at http://eliranwong.com





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